How do LEDs produce light
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How do LEDs produce light

How do LEDs produce light

What are some of the new uses of LEDs with the advent of OLED technology?

With the further increase in performance characteristics of LEDs and the advent of OLEDs the application sector of LEDs has expanded. Below are some of the new uses of LEDs:Luminous walls and ceilingsTransparent walls and partitions that turn opaque at different times of the day.Solar powered fabricsLuminous garments

What are the characteristics of O-LEDs that make it different from other light sources?

O-LEDs are thin, flat, two dimensional surfaces offering a soft, glare-free luminous surface. Some versions of OLED are flexible. They can be transparent, mirrored or diffused when not electrically connected.

What are O-LEDs?

O-LEDs are organic light emitting diodes. They are made of carbon based films sandwiched between two electrodes; one is a metallic cathode and one is a transparent anode, which is usually transparent glass.

What are O-LEDs?

O-LEDs are organic light emitting diodes. They are made of carbon based films sandwiched between two electrodes; one is a metallic cathode and one is a transparent anode, which is usually transparent glass.

Do LEDs require time to reach maximum brightness?

No. LEDs directly convert electrical energy to photons. It is a one step process of electroluminescence that does not require time to reach maximum output. Other sources such as fluorescents or HID, work on discharge technology. This requires an arc to warm up and may take a few minutes to reach full output.

How are LEDs different from other light sources in the way they produce light?

LEDs produce light by direct conversion of electrical energy to light energy.On the other hand incandescent light sources produce light by heating a filament until it grows red hot. Linear and compact fluorescent lamps use a UV discharge plus a phosphor to produce the light. HID lamps use the ionization of gases in a discharge tube which in turn produce photons.

Core components of LED soldered to a printed circuit board

A typical LED is made with a chip, which is the semiconductor that produces the light when electrically connected. The chip is connected by a very thin bond wire to a lead electrical contact that acts as the cathode. The chip is bonded with a thermal heat sink and a ceramic base. The chip is enclosed by a lens that not only protects the chip, but also modulates the light beam to the desired angle, depending on the nature of the lens. For production of white light, the chips are coated with phosphors.

How is light produced in an LED?

Light emitting diodes produce light by the movement of electrons between the two terminals of diode, which occur by a process called electroluminescence. When a light emitting diode is electrically connected, electrons start moving at the junction of the N-type and P-type semiconductors within the diode. When there is a jump over of electrons at the p-n junction, the electron loses a portion of its energy. In regular diodes this energy loss is in the form of heat. However, in LEDs the specific type of N and P conductors produce photons (light) instead of heat. The amount of energy lost defines the color of light produced. Refer to the Philips Lighting Academy weblink as follows for a graphical representation of this process: http://www.lighting.philips.com/main/education/lighting-academy/lighting-academy-browser/led-certification-program.html